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ginlindzey

June 2017

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Jan. 6th, 2017

I have been pushing myself this year to fully invest in using Google Slides and to move away from PowerPoint. As such, anytime I'm setting up a new Google Slide presentation I try to think of new ways to do things. I had a "stulta" moment the other day when I realized that if I embedded a movie for the movie talk IN a slide and did NOT enlarge the screen when showing it, that I could ALSO have vocab words on the same screen.

The last two days (we are on block schedule) I have been doing a movie talk in Latin 1 with Pixar's "Piper."  This is what my screen looked like:



We have just nominally started CLC Stage 6, but my colleague wants to begin Brando Brown Canem Vult soon so I'm busy trying to let go of wanting to do stuff in the book. Then I remembered "Piper" and knew I could really work tenses with this story. .

To keep students awake and prevent the groups that like to talk with their buddies from talking as much, I have students shift after each question. My room is arranged a bit like a theater with three sections, and each section has three rows (the side two at angles) with three desks in each of the first two rows and two seats in the last row. So, after watching the whole video, we started over and we'd watch a bit then I would stop and ask a question in Latin. Students were to discuss the answer in their little group of three student (or two on the back rows), after which I would pick on a row to answer. Then I would indicate for students in the right chair (sella dextra), left chair (sella sinistra), or middle chair (sella media) to get up & switch (surgite et mutate). So each time there would be one new person in the group. Block classes are long and this helps to fight against restlessness too.

When students would answer in Latin, they would usually start in the present tense. We had been practising tenses with gestures (as Nancy Llewellyn teaches), so I would flip their sentence into the imperfect, complete with gestures. I wish I had time to detail how class went, but suffice it to say I felt participation was better because the "helps" were on the screen right with the movie. We got a lot of repetitions in, lots of uses of the subjunctive, etc.

On Monday/Tuesday of next week, we will review and then in groups they will compose their version of the story. I believe we will have time to exchange stories and do some peer editing. If we don't, that's ok too. For the next class I'm hoping to have used their compositions to rewrite the story, this time incorporating postquam, quod, tum, and subito. Or maybe we will combine sentences together.

If you even need help with Google Slides, feel free to contact me. I know most teachers are too busy with the job if teaching Latin (et al) that they often don't learn more than the bare basics of presentation software.